Wednesday, September 8, 2010

The Ghost Galleon (1974)

The third in Armando de Ossorio's BLIND DEAD series, THE GHOST GALLEON has two beautiful young models run afoul of a phantom ship on the open sea that houses the corpses of the Knights Templar. When the girls fail to report back to shore, their sponsors set out to find them, only to become the Templar's next victims! As with the prior two films, Ossorio shows an incredible talent when it comes to establishing an eerie and ominous mood. The galleon's haunted hull is drenched in a nightmarish mist, which shrouds the ship from being discovered and bathes the sets in lurid greens and blues. Once night sets in, the living dead return from their coffins to stalk their prey by sound. These silent, withered corpses are as frightening as ever in their bloodstained cloaks, this time sans their undead steeds. Unfortunately, the repetitive plot is left with nowhere to go once each of the characters have entered the ship. One person will inevitably stray from the group and be killed off by the ghouls, which is followed by effortless filler before the next person will go in search of their missing friend (only to suffer the same fate). In its fully uncut form, the few deaths include a bloody decapitation and other violent attacks. THE GHOST GALLEON is an interesting idea that is simply unable to outdo the previous films, but its brooding atmosphere still makes it a welcome addition to the series.

Rating: 6/10.
Gore: 4/10.

If you liked THE GHOST GALLEON, check out:
NIGHT OF THE SEAGULLS, SHOCK WAVES, CITY OF THE DEAD.

3 comments:

  1. Sounds interesting, haunted ship flicks usually are at least a bit unnerving!

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  2. I thought this was an awful movie outside of a few totally creepy scenes and the ending was awesome. The laughable miniatures do it little favors. Personally, I think Carpenter borrowed elements from both this and the second film in the series for his THE FOG (1979).

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  3. They definitely don't live up to the greatest of and of the Toho films (Mantango obviously comes to mind with this one), but I wouldn't be surprised if Carpenter borrowed the pukey green aesthetic and mists just a litttttttle bit from this one lol..

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