Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Eyes in the Dark (2010)

Access government file: EYES IN THE DARK. Play All. EYES IN THE DARK uses the same "found footage" format that has been popularized in recent film by REC and PARANORMAL ACTIVITY. It strings together various pieces of video evidence that were collected at the investigation sights of several murder scenes in the Cascade Mountains. Videos taken from camcorders and cell phones show signs of a killer beast that has been stalking hikers in the woods, one with glowing red eyes and huge fangs... One of the benefits to this type of filmmaking is the increased sense of reality that is achievable on a non-existent budget. The same holds true for EYES IN THE DARK, but this style also opens it up to a number of common pitfalls. While its dizzying visuals and inaudible dialog detract can from the viewing experience, they also aid in establishing the authenticity of the amateur footage. It is impossible to tell if the decision was made for pure aesthetics, or if it was chosen to cover up the obvious faults in the production, but the weak acting and writing might suggest the latter. Although there are several exciting moments where hints of the monsters appear out of darkness during the attacks, creature fans that are expecting a big payoff in the end may be slightly disappointed. Bjorn Anderson does as much as he can with his limited resources, and comes through with a passable monster film that will only appeal to fans of this particular style.

Rating: 5/10.

If you liked EYES IN THE DARK, check out:
THE ZOMBIE DIARIES, EVIL THINGS, INVASION.

3 comments:

  1. If you want to see the 'found footage' done really well, such that you can't sleep? Check out 'The Last Broadcast' pre-Blair Witch it's a much overlooked masterpiece which has been pushed aside by mainstream trash such as Parasnormal Activity 2.

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  2. Sweet, I will be sure to check it out Paul! Thanks for the recommendation and welcome to the site!

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  3. jervaise brooke hamsterMay 16, 2013 at 2:55 PM

    Still better than anything the British film industry has ever produced.

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