Tuesday, February 26, 2013

All Monsters Attack (1969)

With his parents constantly working, young Ichiro spends his time at home fantasizing that he lives on Monster Island with Godzilla and friends. His day dreaming is interrupted when a group of burglars try to kidnap the boy after a botched bank robbery, but Ichiro uses the strength and courage that he has learned from his monster friends to escape! ALL MONSTERS ATTACK is a unique entry in the Godzilla series, considering Godzilla doesn't even appear in the film outside of Ichiro's imagination. It speaks more towards the sense of loneliness and betrayal that many latchkey children experienced in Japan at the time, when both parents were required to work in order to make ends meet. The success of the Gamera series also weighed heavily on this production, which clearly caters to a younger audience since the giant monster appeal was in steady decline by the late 1960s. ALL MONSTERS ATTACK re-uses footage from previous films as well to cut costs and pad the run time, although it does include several fun new fight scenes between Godzilla and Gabara (named for a bully that picks on Ichiro), and even features a chase scene where Ichiro must escape from the Kamacuras. Many fans who shared in Ichiro's monster dreams as children continue to show a loving admiration for the film, even if it exists outside of the normal canon.

Monsters: Godzilla, Minilla, Gabara, Kamacuras, Ebirah, Kumonga, Gorosaurus.

Rating: 7/10.

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5 comments:

  1. Hey, Carl, I really like this one a lot. I totally identify with the little boy here as I was a latchkey kid, myself. Actually, I thought the whole idea of Japanese parents working too much leaving their children to fend for themselves after school was well realized.

    The reason the recycled footage was used was because effects artist Eiji Tsuburaya died during the filming.

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  2. I agree on the thematic approach, it would have just been nice to see the fantasy elements used to a fuller extent. Totally makes sense that Tsuburaya was lost during this period, very sad though

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  3. I remember seeing this film when I was a kid - loved it!

    Oh, and it seems like you've been spammed, dude. Just read that comment above mine, "i am shure that you will also feel happiness to comment on my this site i will keep" it's almost poetic.

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  4. Does Matthew Broderick make a cameo as a kid?

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  5. Matthew Broderick robs children of their childhood...s? Would that be "childrenhoods"?

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